Why Christian Pedagogy Matters

Education reform is one of those hot-button issues that nearly everyone has an opinion about. People from all different walks of life, political leanings, and faith backgrounds tend to agree that our education systems in the U.S., and in the West in general, need some significant improvements. This week, Jamin Metcalf, M. Ed. student, elaborates on a constructive reclaim of education’s core values within our capitalistic system and presents a renewed understanding of what these values should mean for modern pedagogy and Christian praxis.

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John Crist, Sexual Harassment, and the Church

The current reports of Christian Comedian, Jon Crists’ manipulative behavior towards women has brought to light an important question for the Church: How are we to address situations of abuse and exploitation from within our own faith-learning community? This week Lauren Raley, religion professor at Southeastern University, discusses how we can confront issues of this importance before the entire community becomes affected.

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Affirming Women in Modern Spirituality

The gospel writer Luke speaks of the Spirit coming upon all people … including women … that they may proclaim the prophetic word of God (Acts 2:17-18). Jesus authenticated women for leadership in ministry when he commended Mary of Bethany as she sat at his feet. In this post’s relevant discussion, Dr. Zach Tackett, professor at Southeastern University and ordained AG minister, unravels the significant and crucial role women play in Pentecostal circles while biblically endorsing their leadership in ministry.

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The Merciful Minimalist: Clement of Alexandria on Living Minimally

The contemporary minimalist movement is deeply invested in practicing a renunciation that coincides with the reorientation of one’s desires. Its aim is to live a more meaningful and fulfilling life. According to two prominent leaders of this movement, Joshua Millburn and Ryan Nicodemus, the primary goal of minimalism is to live a meaningful life. While contemporary minimalists draw from the wells of Greek stoicism, there are deep resources that the earliest Christians of North Africa provide when addressing the topic of wealth and simplicity. The Christian theologian and teacher Clement (his name meaning merciful) of Alexandria (150-215 CE) developed a rich understanding of renunciation. This week’s article explores his vision of the Christian life focused on the reorientation of a person’s desires such that simplistic living, where giving becomes normative in one’s personal and communal practice.

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The Groaning of a Prisoner

Grace can cost everything you have to offer and more, but in the end you will declare with Paul, “For I consider that the sufferings of this present time are not worthy to be compared with the glory that is to be revealed to us,” (Rom. 8:18, NASB). In this week’s discussion Dr. Margaret de Alminana, associate professor of theology at Southeastern University, shares her rationale of spiritually rescuing prisoners based on her many years serving as Senior Chaplain of Women at the Orange County Jail.

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Christ, the Savior is Born!

Christmas is the season when families share gifts with one another, hope with those around them, and memories that last a lifetime. The holidays also represent a responsibility to share the good news with others under the firm biblical-grounded belief that Jesus Christ is Savior. In this week’s article, a fresh perspective carries believers into new areas where our attention can be refocused during this busy winter season.

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A Kinder and Gentler Nation: A Tribute to George H. W. Bush

At his inauguration in 1989, Bush implored that Americans have a responsibility “to make kinder the face of the nation and gentler the face of the world.” In this week’s discussion, Dr. Zack Tackett reminisces the impact of George H.W. Bush’s presidency on our nation and dispenses a powerful parallel to how the church may learn from his gentle, political posture.

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Looking Back to Forge Ahead

This year ECCLESIAM launches anew seeking to explore larger issues. Quite a few noteworthy things happened within the church and around the world this summer. What methods can the church employ to cultivate an accountability culture and a confessional environment that invites healing? From mental health to creativity to personal temptation from the pedestal of leadership, we seek to cover and provide pensive, theological, and biblical answers forward through the many struggles that currently confront the church.

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How Should the Church Use Technology?

As the implementation of technology within churches grows exponentially, Croston explains why ecclesiastical communities must tread analytically under its influence. Our nation idolizes a relentlessly “plugged-in” gravitation, which emphasizes the constant pressure to engage with our technological distractions. Through embedding media heavily in church services around the globe, it remains the clerical responsibility to probe the question: is it molding us into a people of God, or is it diverting us from fulfilling our ontological and eschatological intent?

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Remember the Sabbath

In a culture defined by productivity and success, rest has become taboo. Even among Christians, the Biblical precedent of rest laid out in the pattern of creation has been cast aside in favor of the hyperactive rigor of contemporary society. But what is there to gain from remembering the Sabbath that can’t be obtained through hard work? More than you might think.

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Southeastern University