A Blog by Southeastern University's Barnett College of Ministry & Theology

ECCLESIAM

Spring Cleaning: Skeletons in the Closet

We often conceal our vulnerabilities beneath the surface of a smiling countenance, curated social media or distinguished job title. Should we demand justice as Christians when we see hate crimes materialize without attending to the deeper issue? In this week’s article, Dr. Richard Harris, communication’s professor at Southeastern University and former (renounced) Grand Dragon of the Indiana KKK, discusses a seven step process in addressing the infirmities within us.

Read more

The Burden (and Peace) of Jesus

“Jesus, I don’t see you like I used to. I don’t feel you as I did before. I can’t hear your voice.” Where are you!?” Often times, that is my prayer when I’m having a hard week and I have had to carry the weight of the world on my shoulders. Jesus’ response to me is always a boldly stated “I’ve been here! Where have you been? I’ve been here waiting on you!” This week, Hazel Johnson, graduate student at Boston University, takes a look at how we as the church should think about the burdens we place on ourselves. How can we be both responsible, active Christians and rest in the peace of Christ at the same time?

Read more

Biblical Hospitality over Busy Cordiality

The power that hospitality holds is often forgotten. A meaningful cup of coffee brewed with care and intentionality paired with the authentic company of listening ears opens hearts more effectively than trying to convert one’s guests. This week, Juliet Groton, intercultural studies major at Southeastern University, reveals her personal experiences and findings which seek to reinvent the current exemplification of Christian hospitality.

Read more

Art or Entertainment?

Popularity remains a valuable way to make a decision quickly, but it has the tendency to overlook the merits of the losers – the minority who are ruled. Compared to entertainment where output amount states worth, in art, the hero is defined not by popularity but by the artist. In this weeks article, Levi Larson creates a valuable picture for what it means to be a Christ-follower in a world inundated by siding with the popular vote.

Read more

Two Common Myths about Spiritual Gifts

Spiritual gifts are all supernatural in the sense that the Spirit is involved. The Bible affirms, “All these are the work of one and the same Spirit” (1 Corinthians 12:11). Join this week’s discussion as author Andrew K. Gabriel, Ph.D., deconstructs common myths behind spiritual gifts and how a church’s capacity multiplies when it chooses to invest in members’ development.

Read more

Is Auto-Pilot Dominating Our Liturgy?

It seems like every week a worship band outputs a new album. We frequently are flooded with new Christian music; yet, when you enter a typical church on Sunday, the worship team often still sings “Oceans.” Michael Steiner, MBA, compares and applies one of the basic theories of behavioral economics, the dual-system theory, to the repetitive nature found in contemporary worship services and suggests how this negative posture can impose on congregants’ spiritual experience.

Read more

Illumination by Translation

Language identifies common ground by allowing us to communicate with one another succinctly and with a standard. Many times we discover portions of reality that have yet to be created in modern language. This week, Luke Marchesani, a graduate student at Southeastern University, engages with creativity, as defined biblically, while providing a methodology for Christ-followers to embody as they interpret Scripture.

Read more

Profoundly Lonely

According to recent research, about half of all Americans could be considered lonely. Young people in the United States are profoundly lonely. Yet, the loneliness that is plaguing so many young people is not temporary, not born out of a particular event, not a reflective or contemplative isolation. It is a deep, abiding, and cyclical alienation from other people. In this week’s article, Master of Divinity candidate at Boston University School of Theology and a United Methodist Director of Children and Youth Ministries in New England, Dominic J. Mejia explores ways the church as loving community can serve as a means of grace in the lives of folks who feel alienated and disconnected.

Read more

Making Peace with the Warrior God

How are we to deal with certain brutalities found in the Old Testament? How do we know what is and isn’t worthy of God? The good news is that God means to put us in that difficult place. He means to save us not from interpretation but through it. Dr. Chris Green, professor at Southeastern University, provides four approaches on how Christians today should perceive and interpret God’s seemingly violent Old Testament acts in a rather confounding context.

Read more

Finding Courage to Ask and Believe

The biblical example of Habakkuk’s wrestle with God over restoring his modern culture back to Him serves as an aid in addressing today’s conflict against God. What should be done to revive humanity’s spiritual suppression? In this week’s article, Southeastern University President, Kent Ingle, leads us through a sentimentality of asking God for a significant breakthrough amidst our culture’s confusion.

Read more